Staging

Staging
A Clients' Kitchen Staged to Sell!

Welcome!

Thank you for visiting my blog. I have a passion for decorating! And, as a decorator and home stager who's helped many people transform their homes, I wanted to share my ideas and tips with others. Enjoy! My company's motto is: "Home Staging for Selling or Staying!"



Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Decorating Your Thanksgiving Table

It's only a week before the big day! If you're still scratching your head for decorating ideas for your table, here are some suggestions:

1. You can either make or purchase a fall-inspired or Thanksgiving centerpiece. Make one yourself by using a traditional cornucopia centerpiece (similar to the one featured on my blog) with fruit or a fall floral arrangement made with clippings from your garden! Believe it or not, my mums and marigolds are still in bloom! Or, you can then scatter some fall leaves from your yard, very small pumpkins, berries or nuts on the table around the centerpiece to highlight it around your centerpiece (remember to wash your yard-treasures thoroughly before adding them to your table). If you don't feel adventurous in making your own arrangement, then I encourage you to get one from a local florist.

2. You can add candles to your table in fall colors - shades of golds, rusts, greens or browns - or use a set of rustic wooden or metal candleholders to decorate your table. Another suggestion - you can use the candles as a centerpiece. If you use them as your centerpiece, you can arrange autumn foliage, wheat sprigs, berries, nuts, and mini pumpkins and other seasonal vegetables around the base.

3. In lieu of a vase, use a large, hollowed-out pumpkin to display your floral centerpiece. Scatter sprigs of wheat, clusters of berries, nuts and autumn leaves around the base of the pumpkin.

4. Set your table with a tablecloth, table runner, place mats and napkins in the colors of fall -- prints and/or coordinating solids. To avoid a cluttered appearance and to highlight your centerpiece, be careful not to use too many prints on your table.

5. Use napkin rings that reflect the season as well or you can slip a twig of wheat or fall foliage into the fold of the napkin. You can also coordinate the napkin rings, with a similar autumn-inspirted motif, into the table scape.

6. If you have good china or dishes that have autumn motifs and/or colors, suggest that you coordinate them with the colors and other elements of your table's decorations.

7. For a unique place card, beautiful maple leaves (or other suitable leaf) or a mini-pumpkin can be used. If you use leaves, please rinse leaves carefully and pat dry. Once dry, write each guest's name on the leaf or mini-pumpkin with a black or gold felt-tip pen.

Hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving!

Monday, November 8, 2010

Thanksgiving Decorating Ideas for the Exterior of Your Home

Do you want to create a welcoming and exciting home for your Thanksgiving holiday? If your answer is, yes, here's some tips to say "welcome" to your guests the minute they arrive at your front door!

1. Start with the exterior of your home with a simple wreath in the colors of autumn - gold, rust, green and brown. Add a colorful ribbon and attach other fall touches such as nuts, gourds, and raffia.

2. To perk up the area leading to your front door, place one or more gorgeous potted mums and pumpkins near your door. After the holiday, you can plant the flowers. They may pop up next year to provide you with flowers you can use inside.

3. Cover your front door with gift wrap in fall colors for Thanksgiving.

4. Add a "welcome to our home" sign or banner and attach your ribbons or raffia or fall leaves which you've gathered from your yard or garden.

5. Create a grouping of pumpkins, mums and vines for display on the porch or by the walkway to your front door. Be sure to adjust the vines to add height and movement - or add corn stalks or other dried leaves from your garden or flower beds. Make sure to hose off any bugs from your garden additions!

Check in next week for some ideas for decorating the interior of your home for Turkey Day!

Monday, November 1, 2010

Purple is the new color for 2011!

Recently, on my "A Goode Start Decorating and Home Staging" Facebook page, I predicted that in the New Year, the decorating world will embrace "purple" as the newest, popular color for 2011. As a result of my premonition, I decided to do some research on the color which I will share with you below. What I found out is that purple is no longer just your grandmother's color!

Throughout the ages, purple has been associated with royalty. In ancient times, the dye was extracted from mollusk, was extremely expensive and therefore, only available to the rich and to royalty.

On the color wheel, purple is a mixture of the red and blue. Various amounts of red or blue can result in different tints and shades of the color - ranging from the red violet spectrum to the blue violet spectrum: for instance -- magenta (which has a reddish tint) to violet to plum to aubergine (which has a bluish tint).

Although the deeper shades of purple still signify richness and luxury, the softer shades of purple are soothing. Many interior designers (including me) say that using a powerful purple piece in a room “can add passion to a room” and will really pop when set against a complementary background color, like green. For a cohesive look, repeat the purple elsewhere in the room. Purple can also be used in many eclectic decorating schemes. For a bold look, use purple with it's complement, yellow (in various shades in tints, shades and intensities). For a subtle, relaxing ambience, pair purple with shades of grey.


The deepest purples, like aubergines and the brooding blue-tinted shades, imply grandeur and strike a serious, formal note. These tones are best used boldly -- for instance, by painting it on all four walls or a set of built-ins. But go a few tones lighter, and even dark purples will make gathering spaces seem cozy and conversation-friendly.

So, we'll see if my prediction comes true in 2011. In the meantime, happy decorating!

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